Archive | September 23, 2014

PROTON PARTICLES HAVE DRAMATICALLY INCREASED

**URGENT PROTON ALERT**

PROTON PARTICLES HAVE DRAMATICALLY INCREASED. FURTHER EARTHQUAKES, VOLCANO ACTIVITY & ADVERSE WEATHER PATTERNS WILL BE GREATLY INFLUENCED BY THE COSMIC RAYS STRIKING THE EARTH’S CORE

***BE ALERT***

Proton Alert 23.09.14 23.25 hrs UTC

Deadly Ebola Virus; Patient is being tested for the Ebola Virus in Perth Australia

Ebola Virus

A patient is being tested for the deadly Ebola virus in a Western Australian hospital, a spokeswoman for Perth’s Sir Charles Gardiner Hospital confirmed in a statement on Tuesday.
 
“The hospital can confirm it has one patient who is currently being tested for Ebola and appropriate precautions are being taken until the patient’s illness is diagnosed.”
 
The spokeswoman said she could not give any more details about the patient for privacy reasons.
 
She said WA was working closely with other states and the federal government to ensure a coordinated approach to tackle the Ebola threat.
 
“At present, the risk of people with Ebola virus disease travelling to Australia is considered to be very low,” she said.
 
“Even if travellers from west Africa did develop Ebola virus disease after arrival in WA, or elsewhere in Australia, our standard of care and infection control is such that once the disease was diagnosed there would be a very low risk of transmission to other persons.”
 
The spokeswoman said the hospital had already seen “at least one other suspected case”, but no one had been confirmed to have the disease.
 
The latest case comes after a baby who had recently returned to Melbourne from west Africa was suspected of having Ebola.
 
A Gold Coast man was also cleared of having contracted the deadly virus earlier this month after falling ill following a trip to the Democratic Republic of Congo in central Africa.
 
The Ebola outbreak in west Africa has claimed more than 2,800 lives and has infected more than 5,800 people, primarily in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Dangerous and highly contagious pet virus emerges in New Jersey, USA

Parovirus Alert

A highly-contagious illness has taken the lives of dozens of dogs in the Trenton area.  It’s called parvovirus and is often fatal to dogs. 
Parvovirus is most common in puppies and is transmitted from one dog to the other through contaminated feces, according to Dr. Peter Falk, co-chair of the New Jersey Veterinary Medical Association and practicing veterinarian at Ocean County Veterinary Hospital.
 
“The virus doesn’t die immediately when it hits the ground, so if a dog is in the yard or walking in the street where someone was with an infected dog, another dog can get the virus on his or her feet, lick the feet and get infected that way,” Falk said.
 
The virus spreads easily in urban settings or anywhere there is a large concentration of dogs that share playgrounds or go for walks because they have a greater chance of coming into contact with an infected canine. Symptoms of the illness include vomiting, fever, lack of appetite, dehydration and diarrhea.
 
The good news is, there is a vaccine to prevent parvovirus. Puppies should be vaccinated when they are 6 or 7 weeks old.
 
“One vaccine doesn’t give them total immunity. They usually get one each month until they are about 14 weeks or older, then they get a booster,” Falk said. “After that, most parvo vaccines are good for three years.”

Nasty contagious disease targets parents and their children in Central Texas, USA

Virus Alert

Central Texas parents and their children are battling a nasty, contagious disease that doctors haven’t seen in years. The virus is called hand, foot and mouth disease. It usually affects very young children but adults can get it too. Multiple North Austin and Williamson County parents say they’ve come down with it lately. “It burns, hurts, it itched … everything. It was absolutely miserable,” recalls Steve Acord, a KEYE TV employee who caught the virus from his 11-month-old daughter. Acord is still recovering, but he’s no longer contagious. When his daughter came down with the virus, he noticed it didn’t really bring her down at all. “She was still walking around saying, ‘happy,’ all of the time,” Acord explains. Acord was anything but happy when the illness hit him. More than a week later, he still has the remnants of blisters on his hands. Acord says he had a fever, hundreds of blisters on his head, face, hands and feet as well as sores in his mouth. “You wake up and there’d be more on your hands. Then you wake up the next day and it’d be on your head and inside your ears like it was for me,” he recalls. Dr. Richard Kelley at Austin Emergency Center hadn’t seen a case of the disease in years. However, recently, he’s treated multiple adults who got it from their kids. “Kids tend to put things in their mouths — they have a little less discretion — and are basically transferring saliva from each other,” Dr. Kelley explains. He says the illness starts when feces makes it to the mouth. Once someone has it, it’s very contagious. In order to avoid hand, foot and mouth Disease, hand washing is key. “Especially after going to the restroom, obviously. Make sure [kids] are washing their hands,” Dr. Kelley suggests. “I’ve never felt such pain, honestly,” adds Acord. If you come down with the disease it can last 7-10 days. There’s really not much you can do to treat it other than take some medication for the pain and make sure you stay hydrated. Dr. Kelley says hand, foot and mouth Disease doesn’t typically lead to any permanent or serious health problems.

Chikungunya Virus Concern Growing For The Whole Of USA

Chikungunya Virus Alert

Clinicians should be alerted to the possible spread of chikungunya virus in the United States, according to a commentary published online September 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
 
“Clinicians should advise patients to use antivector measures when traveling to regions with chikungunya transmission,” write Davidson Hamer, MD, professor of global health at the Boston University School of Public Health and School of Medicine in Massachusetts, and Lin Chen, MD, from the Division of Infectious Disease at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “Clinicians should consider chikungunya in the differential diagnosis of febrile travellers with arthralgia and rash after visiting regions with chikungunya transmission, including the Caribbean and Central and South America.”
 
Chikungunya causes high fevers, rash, and incapacitating joint pains. Most symptoms clear up within 7 to 10 days, although they have persisted for months or years in some people. Severe disease and complications such as meningoencephalitis and death are rare.
 
Symptoms overlap with dengue virus, and coinfection can occur. Severity and persistence of joint pains help make the differential diagnosis, according to the authors. Clinicians can also use polymerase chain reaction, immunoglobulin M, and immunoglobulin G tests for differentiation..
 
No licensed treatments or vaccines exist; thus, treatment is supportive using anti-inflammatory agents. In addition, Dr. Hamer and Dr. Chen note that public health efforts should focus on identifying infected travelers and interrupting the transmission cycle, using antivector methods such as insect repellents and drainage of mosquito breeding sites.
 
Chikungunya means “that which bends up” or “to be contorted” in the Kimakonde language and was first described in the 1950s in Tanzania. It subsequently spread globally, with outbreaks in West Africa, the Indian Ocean, India, and Southeast Asia. Imported cases to France and Italy by travelers from India have also been reported.
 
In 2013, chikungunya emerged in the Caribbean, where it quickly spread to almost every island, with many cases found in the Dominican Republic and Haiti. In 2014, travelers introduced the virus to Central and South America, where it rapidly became endemic. As of September 5, 2014, the Pan American Health Organization had confirmed 8210 cases and 37 deaths resulting from chikungunya. The continental United States has had 751 reported cases of chikungunya, with local transmission in southern Florida.
 
Several strains of chikungunya virus exist. The current epidemic is caused by the Asian strain, spread most efficiently by the Aedes aegypti mosquito (which also spreads dengue and yellow fever) and less efficiently by the Aedes albopictus mosquito. Because A albopictus occurs farther north, there is a possibility the virus could spread more widely.
Firm Foothold in the United States Debatable
“I do not think that chikungunya will become established in the northern hemisphere. I think it will closely follow the pattern of dengue virus,” Robert Lanciotti, PhD, chief of the Diagnostic and Reference Laboratory in the Arbovirus Diseases Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, commented to Medscape Medical News. “With only a few exceptions in recent history, we have only isolated imported cases [in the United States,] and dengue is not endemic.”
 
Opinions differ, however. In addition to Florida, the Texas–Mexico border could become a hotbed of chikungunya transmission, Scott Weaver, PhD, director of the Institute for Human Infections and Immunity and scientific director of the Galveston National Laboratory at the University of Texas at Galveston told Medscape Medical News. In that location, dengue has a “pretty regular” transmission pattern that “you might consider that endemic,” he said. And chikungunya could follow a similar pattern.
 
Americans, who may be most familiar with West Nile, should be aware of Chikungunya’s different transmission pattern, according to Dr. Weaver. A aegypti mosquitoes bite during the day, like to stay inside houses, and have closer associations with humans than West Nile vectors.
 
“The most important way to protect yourself from chikungunya is to keep mosquitoes out of your house. Here in the US, the main reason we don’t think we’re going to see major outbreaks is because people air condition their houses, or at least have screens that keep mosquitoes out,” Dr. Weaver explained. He added that draining areas of standing water is also important because that is where the mosquito larvae live.
 
Several chikungunya vaccines are under development. Dr. Weaver’s group is partnered with Takeda Pharma and is working on a live attenuated vaccine that has shown promise in nonhuman primates, he said. Another vaccine recently went into human trials in Europe and uses a measles virus vector. Still another, a non–live replicating vaccine developed by the National Institutes of Health, was “fairly immunogenic” in phase 1 human clinical trials. That vaccine was licensed to Merck but currently has no commercial partner after being dropped by Merck a few months ago, according to Dr. Weaver.
 
“Scientifically it’s not particularly difficult to develop a chikungunya vaccine, but the financial side of the equation is much harder to work out,” he revealed, “If a vaccine can make it to the market before chikungunya reaches some of the major Latin American cities, it can have a huge public health impact.”
 
Dr. Hamer reports receiving a grant from the International Society of Travel Medicine. Dr. Chen reports receiving personal fees from Shoreland, Inc; Elsevier Publishing; Springer Publishing; and GlaxoSmithKline. Dr. Weaver reports having a patent for a method of attenuating alpha viruses that could be used in a chikungunya virus vaccine under development. Dr. Lanciotti has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

MASSIVE DIP SPIKES ON THE MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 19:00, 19:30, 21:30 hrs UTC

**EXTREMELY URGENT**
   MASSIVE DIP SPIKES ON THE MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 19:00, 19:30, 21:30 hrs UTC. FURTHER EARTHQUAKES, VOLCANO ACTIVITY & ADVERSE WEATHER PATTERNS WILL BE GREATLY INFLUENCED BY THE COSMIC RAYS STRIKING THE EARTH’S CORE

***BE ALERT***

Magnetogram 23.09.14  21.38 hrs UTC

MAGNITUDE 4.0 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 6.4 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.672  -17.467
(4.5 km NE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   23 Sept 20:40 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   23 Sept 20:40 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 4.5 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 6.2 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.679  -17.480
(4.9 km NNE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   23 Sept 20:40 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   23 Sept 20:40 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 3.0 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 8.4 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.681  -17.486
(5.0 km NNE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   23 Sept 20:40 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   23 Sept 20:40 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 3.4 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 7.9 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.678  -17.481
(4.7 km NNE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   23 Sept 20:40 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   23 Sept 20:40 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude