Archive | November 15, 2014

MAGNITUDE 3.6 WYOMING, USA

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=408851

Subject To Change

Depth: 2 km

Distances: 959 km NE of Phoenix, United States / pop: 1,445,632 / local time: 15:02:39.6 2014-11-15
176 km W of Cheyenne, United States / pop: 59,466 / local time: 15:02:39.6 2014-11-15
62 km N of Steamboat Springs, United States / pop: 12,088 / local time: 15:02:39.6 2014-11-15
47 km S of Saratoga, United States / pop: 1,690 / local time: 15:02:39.6 2014-11-15


Global viewRegional view

MASSIVE DIP SPIKES ON THE MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 22:45 hrs UTC

**VERY URGENT**
   MASSIVE DIP SPIKES ON THE MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 22:45 hrs UTC. FURTHER EARTHQUAKES, VOLCANO ACTIVITY & ADVERSE WEATHER PATTERNS WILL BE GREATLY INFLUENCED BY THE COSMIC RAYS STRIKING THE EARTH’S CORE

***BE ALERT***

Magnetogram 15.11.14  22.49 hrs UTC

Historic snow events in Central Texas, USA

Snow is a rare sight in Central Texas
Snow Alert
With the recent rush of cold air and winter peeking around the corner, the possibility of a huge snow storm in Austin could give you a quizzical look, but it has happened before.
 
The earliest measurable snow of the season fell in Austin Nov. 14, 1959, with the latest coming March 27, 1930. If you are hoping for a white Christmas, no records have been found with enough snow to measure.
 
Snow is a rare sight in Central Texas. Putting it into perspective, Austin only accumulated 0.1 inch of snow in Jan. 2014. The largest total since 2000 is slightly less than 2 inches, which fell on Valentine’s Day in 2004. Prior to 1970, some impressive storms rolled through.
 
Since record keeping began in 1892 for Austin, only four times has snow piled up 6 inches or more in a single storm. The most snow recorded from a storm was 11 inches on Nov. 22-23, 1937.
 
The National Weather Service notes the largest single-day snowfall was Nov. 11, 1937 with 9.7 inches accumulation. After looking through data from the NWS and weather maps from 1937, snow was not possible that day. Temperatures across Central Texas on the day in question were in the 70s. The Austin History Center also has no photographic evidence of snow on that date.
 
“In this particular case, there was a summary .pdf file that we had on our website with data that an incorrect amount was placed on that summary,” Steve Smart, Observing Program Leader with the National Weather Service explains. “The correct information still resides at the National Climatic Center, and that’s where we verify the information to be correct.”
 
It turns out there was an error at the local National Weather Service office. Because of KVUE’s research, the document has been corrected. The National Climatic Data Center holds correct information on every recorded weather event as well as daily observations. This data was used to correct the error.
 
Whether it’s, autumn, winter, or even spring, historical records have proven snow can fall prior to Thanksgiving and after St. Patrick’s Day.

Northeast Ohio, USA hammered by first lake effect snow event of the season

“I love winter, but this amount of snow is crazy for November,” wrote one Instagram user on Friday morning
View image on Twitter
Northeast Ohio is used to the snow. Situated firmly in the snow belt of Lake Erie, seasonal amounts can accumulate feet upon feet by the end of winter. But that doesn’t make the first lake effect snow event any less inconvenient, especially when it hammers the region with over a foot of snow in fewer than 24 hours.
 
“I love winter, but this amount of snow is crazy for November,” wrote one Instagram user on Friday morning.
 
The flakes began to fly early Thursday morning from Cleveland to Erie, Pa., when rain changed over to snow, fueled by the relatively warm water of Lake Erie. By 10 a.m., a strong band of lake effect snow had set up over Lake and Ashtabula counties — the two northeastern-most counties in Ohio.
 
Lake County, which has accumulated at least a foot as of Friday morning, took the brunt of the storm on Thursday. A snow emergency was declared in Mentor, Ohio when snow began to fall too fast for road crews to clear it out.
Thunder was booming across the region as the snow poured from the sky. Thundersnow is not unheard of, but it’s rare — it requires very strong uplift in the atmosphere, which also just happens to produce extremely large snowfall amounts.
 
Chris Zimmer caught the lightning and thunder in Mentor, Ohio, on Thursday afternoon:
The ill-timing of the storm meant that some of the heaviest snow fell during the evening commute. Major thoroughfares, including Interstate 90, turned into traffic nightmares on Thursday evening, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer:
A stuck semi and other vehicles were cleared and the interstate reopened just after 9 p.m., said Trooper Ryan Orose of the Ohio Highway Patrol’s Geauga Post.
 
However, travel remained treacherous on the road late Thursday and early Friday morning. Just after midnight, Mentor police began diverting traffic off of I-90 eastbound lanes at Ohio 615 north to Ohio 2 because of slick conditions. Salt trucks from the Ohio Department of Transportation were on the way to treat the interstate, police said.
 
The section was reopened at about 2:45 a.m.
 
“It takes a number of things to line up for (lake-effect snow) to get going, but they did line up today,” NWS meteorologist Brian Mitchell told the Plain Dealer.
 
Mentor schools are closed on Friday due to the weather and road conditions.
View image on Twitter
And the snow keeps coming in the Cleveland metro area. On Friday morning, the western suburbs were getting hit the hardest, with snowfall rates up to three inches per hour falling in the west side suburb of Bedford, Ohio.
 
Lake effect snow warnings and advisories are in effect across the region through Saturday morning. Given the heavy band of snow that has set up over the western suburbs on Friday morning, a lake effect snow advisory was upgraded to a warning in Cuyahoga County, which includes the city of Cleveland.
 
The National Weather Service is expecting at least two to five inches of snow through Friday afternoon, with another four inches on Friday night. Of course, in areas where a particularly heavy band sets up, all bets are off in terms of potential accumulation — some areas could see up to 20 inches of snow by the time this lake effect event is over on Saturday.
View image on Twitter

MASSIVE DIP SPIKES ON THE MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 20:00, 20:30 hrs UTC

**VERY URGENT**
   MASSIVE DIP SPIKES ON THE MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 20:00, 20:30 hrs UTC. FURTHER EARTHQUAKES, VOLCANO ACTIVITY & ADVERSE WEATHER PATTERNS WILL BE GREATLY INFLUENCED BY THE COSMIC RAYS STRIKING THE EARTH’S CORE

***BE ALERT***

Magnetogram 15.11.14  20.28 hrs UTC

MAGNITUDE 5.0 SULAWESI, INDONESIA

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/usc000sxng#summary

Subject To Change

Depth: 39 km

Distances: 83km (52mi) E of Luwuk, Indonesia
185km (115mi) SSE of Gorontalo, Indonesia
302km (188mi) SSW of Tomohon, Indonesia
303km (188mi) SSW of Tondano, Indonesia
859km (534mi) NNW of Dili, East Timor

Global view

MAGNITUDE 3.6 GERMANY

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=408774

Subject To Change

Depth: 5 km

Distances: 162 km SE of Amsterdam, Netherlands / pop: 741,636 / local time: 12:35:33.4 2014-11-15
53 km N of Düsseldorf, Germany / pop: 573,057 / local time: 12:35:33.4 2014-11-15
2 km N of Dorsten, Germany / pop: 79,981 / local time: 12:35:33.4 2014-11-15


Global viewRegional view

MAGNITUDE 3.1 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 7.2 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.673 -17.474
(4.4 km NE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   15 Nov 20:10 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   15 Nov 20:10 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 3.9 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 6.9 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.677 -17.479
(4.7 km NNE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   15 Nov 20:10 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   15 Nov 20:10 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 4.2 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 4 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.659 -17.494
(2.6 km NE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   15 Nov 20:10 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   15 Nov 20:10 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude