Thousands of dead fish found ‘mysteriously’ floating in a lake in London, England


An investigation is underway after thousands of dead fish were found floating in an east London park lake.

The grim discovery was made by volunteers in Harrow Lodge Park, Havering, over the weekend.

Havering Council has launched an environmental health investigation to find out what caused the mass death.      

Councillor Melvin Wallace said: “We’re still trying to determine the exact cause of the incident.

“We believe it’s either due to an extensive amount of un-oxygenated water that entered the lake due to the heavy rainfall over the weekend, or a possible pollutant.

“The Environment Agency has tested the water and we’re currently waiting for the results.”

Council staff have since removed the fish from the lake.

It is not the first time animals have died in the lake. Earlier this year several birds contaminated with avian botulism were found dead in the park while 20 ducks were killed by visitors feeding them mouldy bread.

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One response to “Thousands of dead fish found ‘mysteriously’ floating in a lake in London, England”

  1. william conrad says :

    Dead fish and birds falling from the sky are being reported worldwide, suddenly. This is not a local affair, obviously. Dead birds have been reported in Sweden and N America, and dead fish in N America, Brazil, and New Zealand. Methane is known to cause bird death, and as methane rises when released during Earth shifting, will float upward through the flocks of birds above. But can this be the cause of dead fish? If birds are more sensitive than humans to methane release, fish are likewise sensitive to changes in the water, as anyone with an aquarium will attest. Those schools of fish caught in rising methane bubbles during sifting of rock layers beneath them will inevitably be affected. Fish cannot, for instance, hold their breath until the emergency passes! Nor do birds have such a mechanism.

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