Archive | December 10, 2014

MAGNITUDE 4.4 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 0.7 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.658 -17.386
(7.0 km ENE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 4.2 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 1.2 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.616 -17.396
(6.8 km ESE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 4.2 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 6.2 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.676 -17.498
(4.2 km NNE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 4.3 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 3.9 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.673 -17.445
(5.4 km NE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 4.0 ICELAND REGION

Subject to change

Depth: 0.4 km
 

Distances: Latitude, Longitude  64.660 -17.482
(3.1 km NE of Bárðarbunga)

Earthquake location   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Map of earthquake epicentres

Time and magnitude of earthquake   10 Dec 23:30 GMT

Graph showing earthquake timing and magnitude

MAGNITUDE 6.1 TAIWAN REGION

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=412540

Subject To Change

Depth: 256 km

Distances: 112 km NE of Taipei, Taiwan / pop: 7,871,900 / local time: 05:03:39.2 2014-12-11
89 km NE of Keelung, Taiwan / pop: 397,515 / local time: 05:03:39.2 2014-12-11


Global viewRegional view

MAGNITUDE 5.1 BABUYAN ISL REGION, PHILIPPINES

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=412537

Subject To Change

Depth: 20 km

Distances: 393 km S of Kaohsiung, Taiwan / pop: 1,519,711 / local time: 04:27:52.7 2014-12-11
180 km N of Tuguegarao City, Philippines / pop: 115,105 / local time: 04:27:52.7 2014-12-11
116 km NW of Buguey, Philippines / pop: 3,111 / local time: 04:27:52.7 2014-12-11
62 km N of Namuac, Philippines / pop: 3,037 / local time: 04:27:52.7 2014-12-11


Global viewRegional view

Savage hail storm causes mayhem in the Hunter Valley, Australia

Hail Formation Alert

Residents of Bulga in the Hunter Valley will spend the day counting the cost after a second savage hail storm hit the area in less than a week.
 
The storm late yesterday dumped up to 80 millimetres of rain and hail on the area leaving paddocks awash and adding to a mounting damage bill.
 
Hail dumped last Friday damaged wine grape crops in the area, with some vineyards losing all of their fruit for the next vintage.
 
Bulga resident Graeme O’Brien says the latest storm took them by surprise.
 
“Our good car wasn’t parked in the shed, didn’t see the hail coming,” he said.
 
“This cloud wasn’t that colour that you typically get hail out of.
 
“Anyway, next minute there was lots of hail and now there’s little round pock marks on three horizontal surfaces of the car.”

Mega storm with hurricane-force winds and flooding is on the way to California, USA

Severe Weather Alert

Crews in Northern California cleared storm drains and residents loaded up on sandbags Wednesday ahead of a powerful storm expected to pack hurricane-force winds capable of toppling trees and power lines and heavy rains causing streams and rivers to flood.
 
As much as 8 inches of rain could fall on coastal mountains over a 24-hour period starting late Wednesday, the National Weather Service said. Ski resorts in the northern Sierra Nevada could get more than 2 feet of snow.
 
“It’s a short amount of time for that amount of water,” Weather Service forecaster Diana Henderson said. “We are anticipating some localized flooding, maybe some downed trees and downed power trees. It could have an effect on a wide range of people.”
 
The storm is expected to be one of the windiest and rainiest in five years and could also cause debris slides, especially in areas affected by this year’s intense and widespread wildfires.
 
Wind gusts of up to 70 mph were forecast on mountain tops, creating blizzard-like conditions.
 
In California’s agricultural heartland, farmers were looking forward to the dousing after three years of drought.
 
Though workers would have to stop picking citrus, rain this time of year tends to make fruit bigger, allowing it to fetch higher prices at market, said James McFarlane, a third-generation farmer who grows mandarin oranges, almonds and alfalfa in Fresno County.
 
“If we’re not getting some Mother Nature-dictated time off out in the field, that probably means we’re going to have a hard time finding surface water in the warmer months,” he said.
 
The rain and, more important, the snow falling in the Sierra Nevada that melts during the spring and summer fill the reservoirs that supply irrigation water during the hot, dry months.
 
In San Francisco, where as much as 4 inches of rain was forecast, crews removed loose rocks from a hillside to prevent them from crashing down, and residents were advised to sweep up leaves and debris in front of their properties to prevent them from clogging storm drains.
 
“We have crews working starting tonight in 12-hour shifts,” said Rachel Gordon, a spokeswoman for San Francisco’s public works agency. “It will be all hands on deck.”
 
Farther north, a series of strong weather fronts with high winds and heavy rains could lead to flooding and landslides this week in western Washington state.
 
The National Weather Service expects as much as 14 inches of rain between Monday and Thursday in the Olympic Mountains west of Seattle. And it expects as much as 13 inches of rain in the North Cascades east of the city.
 
Saturated soils will bring the risk of mudslides, while winds could topple trees.
 
High winds were also forecast in Oregon.

Massive meteorite has been found by Korean scientists in Antarctica

According to Chosunbiz, Korean scientists working at the Jang Boko Science (Korean Polar Research Institute) Base in Antarctica announced they have discovered a meteorite. The research center reported that this was the largest meteorite that was ever found by Korean scientists. It was found at a location some 300 kilometers away from the base.
 
The Korean Polar Research Institute (KORPI) has begun exploring the Antarctic ever since the year 2006 and have embarked upon 8 expeditions. This expedition, a team of 4 led by Dr. Jong-Ik Lee, arrived at the Jang Boko base on the 7th of November, and their research there will continue until the 17th of December.
 
Scientists have shown great interest in meteorites for they believe they could find clues to the origin of the Earth by researching these specimens. Meteors found in Antarctica, they believe are the remains of small asteroids from the asteroid belt between Jupiter and Mars and these interest scientists most. 80 percent of meteorites held by Korean research institutes are said to be found in the Antarctic.
 
KORPI researchers are planning to analyze the most recent discovery with an electronic microscope and the results will be reported to the International Meteor Organization (IMO). Dr. Lee’s team is also planning to search for traces of space dust near the location of the meteor’s impact.
 
KORPI scientists will be continuing their research in Antarctica in their search for the origin of the Earth.