Archive | February 15, 2015

Thousands of dead fish found in a lake in Jabalpur, India

Hanumantal Saturday morning in thousands of small and big fish Utrati eye condition Arin dead. The news spread in the area in a hurry and got people throng the lake shore. JMC in the first degree of the health official cause of death of fish in the pond water shortages or pollution told Aaksijn. JMC’s staff has been off for cleaning the pond.

Kshetriyjnon death of so many fish in the pond is fear. Added, raising fears of people in pond water are poisoned. While in terms of elders too much last night because of fog in the pond water fish have died from lack of Aaksijn. Of people today live in fear of poison pond appeared hesitant.

Due to the death of fish in the water shortage may Aaksijn. It may also be responsible for the pollution or it is feared that someone has found something Visalni in pond water. Water Department will investigate. Dr Vinod Shrivastava, Medic JMC

Courtesy of Pradesh Today

Thousands of birds ‘die suddenly’ due to avian flu in Lendah, Indonesia

Bird Alert

Laboratory test results Center for Veterinary (BBVet) Wates indicates that thousands of quail and other fowl in Lendah who died suddenly while back positive for bird flu virus or avian influenza.

Certainty is expressed by the Head of the Department of Marine, Fisheries and Livestock Kulonprogro , Endang Purwaningrum, Thursday (01/08/2015). According to him, reports of newly delivered BBVet, based on testing of samples of dead quail were sent to the laboratory on Tuesday.

“Officers pdrs (Participatory Disease Surveillance Response) DVM Ambar thistle has obtained the report, the results are positive,” said Endang.

The death of thousands of these birds occur in Lendah, precisely at the farm belonging to Ponijo (75), a resident of Hamlet Sedan, Sidorejo Village, Monday (01/05/2015). At least 3,500 quail died suddenly at his ranch, after preceded in death enthog and his chickens.

Officers came to the scene to identify the farm. When the on-site rapid test showed negative results. However, the rapid test was estimated to be incomplete, so the officer sends quail carcass samples to BBVet for sure.

Because the instructions in the field said that the dead birds with characteristics such as bird flu. After research in BBVet, yesterday the Department of Animal Husbandry states corresponding laboratory results that the birds died of bird flu virus positive.

Courtesy of Tribune Jogja

150 Birds dead due to oil spill in Northwest Ohio, America

Bird Alert

Authorities discovered another 125 dead, oil-soaked birds — mostly ducks —  today near the vicinity of Saturday’s Titan Tire spill, bringing the total number of dead animals to 150, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources said.

John Windau, spokesman for the Ohio DNR’s wildlife division, said the agency continues to work with volunteers and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assess the total loss.

The Ohio DNR will consider filing charges once it believes it knows the full extent of the damage, Mr. Windau said.

Meanwhile, efforts to decontaminate about 400 surviving ducks continue, he said.

Volunteers are working with Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research, Inc., of Newark, Del., to wash off oil. Each bird takes about an hour to clean, Lisa Smith, the group’s executive director, has said.

The spill was reported to the Bryan Fire Department Saturday morning by a local waterfowl hunter, Dick Long.

The fire department and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency traced the spill to Titan Tire’s factory on South Union Street. The company has not responded to requests for interviews.

Dina Pierce, Ohio EPA spokesman, has said there was a problem with a valve on an above-ground storage tank, releasing used lube oil into Prairie Creek, better known in Williams County as Ditch 40.

Ditch 40 flows into the Tiffin River, a Maumee River tributary.

Courtesy of The Blade

100,000+ dead seabirds found since October along west coast of America100,000+ dead seabirds found since October along west coast of America

Bird Alert

Scientists are trying to determine why thousands of tiny seabirds called Cassin’s auklets have washed up on the West Coast, all the way from B.C. to California.

More than 100,000 carcasses of the small, white-bellied birds have been found dead since October, including hundreds found along Long Beach in Pacific Rim National Park near Tofino, B.C.

Experts say young auklets often die during winter storms, but this year up to 100 times the normal number are washing ashore in some places along the coast.

About 80 per cent of the species’ breeding population of 3.5 million birds is estimated to live around the Scott Islands, located off the northern tip of Vancouver Island.

Ucluelet resident Mary Christmas said that in her decades walking the beaches near her home on the west coast of Vancouver Island she had never seen anything like what she found Dec. 22.

“There were about 100 dead birds. It was quite disturbing,” said Christmas.

Parks Canada staff collected 157 dead Cassin’s auklets from a small section of Long Beach nearby. Some were frozen and sent for necropsies to try to understand what is causing the mass die-off.

Others have reported finding hundreds of the birds on beaches in Haida Gwaii, located to the north of Vancouver Island.

U.S. testing points to starvation

Scientists are trying to determine why thousands of tiny seabirds called Cassin’s auklets have washed up on the West Coast, all the way from B.C. to California.

More than 100,000 carcasses of the small, white-bellied birds have been found dead since October, including hundreds found along Long Beach in Pacific Rim National Park near Tofino, B.C.
Auklets die off

Mass die-offs of Cassin’s aucklets, small, white-bellied grey birds, have been reported from British Columbia to San Luis Obispo, Calif. (Ben Margot/Associated Press)

Experts say young auklets often die during winter storms, but this year up to 100 times the normal number are washing ashore in some places along the coast.

About 80 per cent of the species’ breeding population of 3.5 million birds is estimated to live around the Scott Islands, located off the northern tip of Vancouver Island.

Ucluelet resident Mary Christmas said that in her decades walking the beaches near her home on the west coast of Vancouver Island she had never seen anything like what she found Dec. 22.

“There were about 100 dead birds. It was quite disturbing,” said Christmas.

Parks Canada staff collected 157 dead Cassin’s auklets from a small section of Long Beach nearby. Some were frozen and sent for necropsies to try to understand what is causing the mass die-off.

Others have reported finding hundreds of the birds on beaches in Haida Gwaii, located to the north of Vancouver Island.
U.S. testing points to starvation

While Parks Canada staff await results, University of Washington biologist Julia Parrish said some evidence suggests the birds are not being affected by any sort of toxin, but are starving to death.

Parrish said it is unclear why, because other birds that feed on the same types of shrimp and plankton aren’t affected.
Cassin’s auklet

Cassin’s auklets are small seabirds that spend much of their life in the open water of the north Pacific Ocean.

“We have never seen a die-off of Cassin’s like this,” said Parrish.

Her best guess is several factors are at play, including too many young birds born this year, conditions at sea pushing them closer to shore than normal and perhaps something involving their prey.

“We are also hypothesizing — this is not proven, so our best guess — that these birds, which normally can go quite far out to sea — they’re small birds but they’re tough little things, and they’ll spend the winter far out over the North Pacific — we think for some reason the whole population is much closer to the shore,” said Parrish.

“So when a Cassin’s is dying, it has a much greater chance of reaching the shore … than normal,” she speculated.

Whether the die-off is being triggered by natural forces or if something else is at play, Parrish said, the result is still unfortunate.

“It’s a tragic event. It’s an untoward event.… We have never seen a die-off of Cassin’s like this, so that in and of itself says something.”

“I don’t think it’s going to cause the population to wink out, but it’s enough to make me sit up and pay attention.”

Courtesy of CBC News

Hundreds of animals dead from wildfires in Southern Australia

Hundreds of animals are believed to have been killed in South Australia since bushfires began burning out of control in the Adelaide Hills last Friday.

Vets and animal rescue teams have gained access to parts of the devastated areas to treat pets, livestock and native animals.

However, many animals have not survived or have been put down, according to animal welfare groups.

The fires have been raging across some 12,500 hectares (30,888 acres) of land about 30 minutes drive south east of Adelaide.

More than 100 people have needed hospital treatment, while at least 32 homes (revised down from 38) and 125 outhouses have been destroyed.

Rain was falling on parts of the Adelaide Hills on Wednesday afternoon, bringing some relief to firefighters who have reportedly now contained much of the blaze.

But lightning strikes and damaging winds could pose more hazards, according to Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology.

Many animals not killed or burnt by the fires have been left without food, water or access to shelter, according to the South Australian branch of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA).

The extent of the loss of animal life was unknown, so far, chief executive officer of the state’s RSPCA, Tim Vasudeva, told the BBC. He said many areas were still subject to dangerous fire flare ups.

RSPCA staff and vets have been moving from property to property feeding and watering companion animals such as dogs, cats and horses, sending some animals away to be treated, or humanely euthanising those too badly hurt to survive.

“In the case of dogs and cats, if they are healthy you just need to make sure they are secure, feed and water them and make a note of what property they are on,” said Mr Vasudeva.

“We have taken koalas out, we have treated horses on properties and wildlife in the bush and we have taken quite a few animals away [for treatment].”

The Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation (AMWRRO) has treated the burnt paws of a young male koala brought to its Torrens Island centre 15km northwest of Adelaide.

The koala, found in the Adelaide Hills, would likely have died if it had not been rescued, AMWRRO President Aaron Machado told the BBC. He said staff were confident the koala would recover in a couple of months and be released back into the wild.

Dubbed Jeremy by the staff, the koala faced a high chance of dying from infection or starvation, said Mr Machado.

“Koalas don’t have immune systems so the risk of death from infection is very high. We have cleaned his wounds and dressed them with sterile bandages,” he said.

“They get to a point where they are in so much pain … they just sit at the bottom of a tree and scream.”

In one of the worst cases discovered so far, firefighters managed to save more than 40 dogs at one commercial kennel in Inglewood but a large number of animals reportedly died, including all of the cats.

The owners of the Tea Tree Gully Boarding Kennels and Cattery initially used social media to share the news of what had happened but soon had to close their sites because of hate mail posted online.

“We have lost a home, business and pets we love and feel so awful about the loss of people’s beloved pets,” a post on the business’s Facebook page said, according to ABC News.

South Australia’s Primary Industries Department said it was too early to tell how many livestock had died.

Chief veterinary officer, Roger Paskin, told local media the department was offering assistance to property owners.

“We will send teams out to evaluate their livestock and assist with them with that and if necessary to euthanise livestock that are too badly burnt to recover,” he said.

Courtesy of The BBC

10 dead beached whales during the past couple of weeks ‘baffle experts’ on West Coast of Scotland, United Kingdom

A SPATE of deaths of the world’s deepest-diving mammal around the west coast of Scotland has left marine experts baffled.

Scientists at the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust (HWDT) and Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme (SMASS) say an unusually large number of Cuvier’s beaked whales have been found dead over the past couple of weeks.

The species, also known as the goose-beaked whale, is rarely seen due to its hunting grounds being around 80 miles offshore, but five carcasses were found washed up on Scottish shores in December.

This amounts to a five-fold increase in the number of annual strandings reported for the species in each of the previous three years.

Last month’s “weather bomb”, an unidentified disease or even interference from sonar operations at sea have all been considered as potential causes, but scientists say evidence is conflicting since only a single species appears to have been affected. The badly decomposed state of the corpses has meant post-mortem examinations have also failed to provide any pointers.

“There are no obvious clues as to what is causing such a sudden increase in strandings of this species,” said Dr Conor Ryan, sightings and strandings officer for HWDT.

“While the very intense storms of mid-December may be partly to blame, this does not explain why we are finding just one deep-diving species in such high numbers.”

There was a similar unexplained spike in strandings during 2008, although there was a mix of deep-diving species among the 57 fatalities.

SMASS director Dr Andrew Brownlow said: “We don’t receive many reports of them and to receive so many over the western seaboard is unusual.

“First of all, do these have a single origin? Is there something that has happened at a single place that has cause a lot of deaths, and the bodies have gradually been moved by tides and currents and are now washing up on beaches?

“The recent massive storm surge and huge swell will have scoured the eastern Atlantic and brought things from a long way out to sea and dumped them on western shores.

“However, if it was simply a question of weather and we happened to be a catchment area because a westerly was pushing dead animals on to the beaches when normally they would sink, we would expect lots of other whales as well.

“This is making us believe that perhaps there is something specifically affecting this species.”

Dr Ryan said an Irish whale and dolphin group had also recorded similarly high deaths of Cuvier’s beaked whales, which can grow up to 23 feet long.

Five were found dead along the west and north coast in December, accounting for almost 10 per cent of all known strandings of the species since records began.

The SMASS has only recorded 37 strandings of the species in Scotland in the past 25 years – 17 of these during the 2008 spike.

Recent beachings were on the Isle of Mull, the coast of Sutherland and Borve Point on Benbecula, in the Outer Hebrides.

The Cuvier’s whale holds the world record for the longest and deepest dive for a mammal – down to 2,992 metres for a staggering two hours and 17 minutes. The pressure at this depth is 300kg per square centimetre.

There are no global population estimates for the species, although they are generally thought to be one of the most abundant of the beaked whales.

Deepest diver can live for up to 40 years

Cuvier’s beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) is the only member of the genus Ziphius and is the most widely distributed of the beaked whales.

One animal has been recorded diving down to 9,816ft (2,992 metres) below the waves, which is around 6.75 times the height of the Empire State Building.

The creature has a robust, cigar-shaped body similar to other beaked whales.

It can grow up to 23ft (7 metres) long and can weigh 5,500lb (2,500kg).

The whale has a small dorsal fin and flippers to prevent drag while swimming.

It lives for around 40 years and feeds on different species of squid and deep sea fish.

Cuvier’s whales can be found in a number of different deep offshore waters from the tropics to cool seas.

It is thought there may be over 100,000 of the creatures in seas across the world.

The whale gets its name from the anatomist George Cuvier – who first described its imperfect skull, in 1804.

Courtesy of The Scotsman

http://tinyurl.com/lvcarrm

Thousands of fish have died in Sher Shah lake in India

Fish Kill Alert

Thousands of fish have died in historical Sher Shah Suri Lake in Lal Bangla area of the city since Sunday evening.

Local corporator Aditya Shukla said that residents of the area saw dead fish floating in Sher Shah Suri lake. “Again on Monday morning, we found thousands of fish lying motionless in the river,” he added.

A team from the zonal office of Kanpur Municipal Corporation visited the spot and spread chlorine in the lake.

The residents expressed apprehension about the fish being given poison which proved fatal. “There may be chances of fish being poisoned as even big fish too have died. The count being high and it is not possible for pollutant or contamination in water to cause such a high number of deaths,” they added.

The municipal authorities had assured for cleanliness of the lake but action was missing. After much persuasion, sanitary workers sprinkled chlorine in the lake.

The locals helplessly watched the fish dying. According to residents, over a quintal of dead fish were taken out from the lake on Monday evening and buried in four big pits near the water body.

The locals were seen using submersible pumps to rotate water in the lake.

Courtesy of The Times Of India

Hundreds (possibly thousands) of dead snapper fish found, ‘a mystery’ in Doubtless Bay, New Zealand

Fish Kill Alert

One of hundreds, possibly thousands, of snapper seen floating on the surface in Doubtless Bay on December 21. Photo / Mark Osborne One of hundreds, possibly thousands, of snapper seen floating on the surface in Doubtless Bay on December 21. Photo / Mark Osborne

Taipa man Mark Osborne wasn’t as quick as some to point the finger at commercial fishermen after he found hundreds of dead snapper floating over a wide area at the entrance to Doubtless Bay.

He wasn’t able to think of any other plausible explanation, however, when he found the fish on December 21.

The water had looked a little odd, he said, possibly as the result of an algal bloom or some such phenomenon.

However, that would not explain why only snapper had succumbed.

Mr Osborne’s experience came exactly seven days after scores of dead snapper were found on Tokerau Beach.

Fish were also reported, by other sources, at Maitai Bay and Karikari Beach late last week.

Some of the fish found at Tokerau were described by locals as fresh, as were some seen by Mr Osborne a week later, making it unlikely that they all came from the same source.

Others at both locations had clearly been dead for some time.

Mr Osborne said the fish he saw were exclusively snapper, ranging from legal size to around 3.6kg. He saw no evidence that they had been hooked or suffered net damage.

“There was nothing to suggest they had been thrown overboard from a boat, but given that there were no other species I can’t think of any other explanation. It’s a bit of a mystery,” he said.

“We saw hundreds of them, but I imagine that all up there would have been thousands,” he added.

Whatever the cause, a reliably productive fishing spot had that day yielded just one snapper, smaller than the legal minimum.

Meanwhile, further angry contributions have been made to Facebook following the discovery earlier this month of a pile of snapper frames on 90 Mile Beach and dozens of empty paua shells at Tauroa, none of the latter reportedly being of legal size.

Courtesy of The Northern Advocate

Thousands of fish have died in a fish farm in Kampung Baru, Malaysia

Rosli Abas melihat ikan siakap miliknya yang mati akibat air lumpur
Rosli Abas see seabass hers who died of muddy water into the pond in Kampung Baru Fishermen, dense, yesterday.

A breeder suffered losses of about RM40,000 when sea bass reared in cages in the river Kampung Baru Fishermen, near here died of yellow mud brought a flood on three weeks ago.

The farmer concerned, Tengku Norlia Tengku Ali, 41, said the incident involved only knowing about 6pm after being informed that her husband Jim Abas, 51, who fell into the river to feed the fish farming.

“It is believed that most of the dead sea bass as mud problems that were brought together into the river during heavy flooding recently.

“Seeing the situation, he quickly pulled out fish dying in the hope that it can be sold even with the cheap,” he told Utusan Malaysia here today.

Tengku Norlia tell, it was not the first incident occurred because last year he suffered a loss of nearly 50,000 cage waters in the area is contaminated.

At that point, he said, he only managed to save part only, while about 12,000 barramundi fish tail again failed to be rescued.

“Most of the fish should be marketed but no sustenance for dead,” he said.

Courtesy of Utusan Online