Archive | February 6, 2016

MEGA DIP SPIKES ON THE WEAK MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 21:00, 21:30, 21:45 HRS UTC

**VERY URGENT**
  MEGA DIP SPIKES ON THE WEAK MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 21:00, 21:30, 21:45 HRS UTC. FURTHER EARTHQUAKES, VOLCANO ACTIVITY & ADVERSE WEATHER PATTERNS WILL BE GREATLY INFLUENCED BY THE COSMIC RAYS STRIKING THE EARTH’S CORE

***BE ALERT***

Magnetogram 06.02.16  22.59 hrs UTC

Zika Virus Infects 3,100 Pregnant Women In Colombia

Zika Virus Alert

Thousands of pregnant women in Colombia are infected with the Zika virus, and there are fears the number could reach 600,000
 
More than 3,100 pregnant women are infected with the Zika virus in Colombia, the country’s president has said.
 
They are among the 25,645 cases reported nationwide so far, as the mosquito-borne disease continues to spread rapidly across the Americas.
 
President Juan Manuel Santos also projected there could be up to 600,000 infections in 2016.
 
At present, there is no known treatment or vaccine for the Zika virus, which has been linked to microcephaly – a birth defect which can prevent the brains of foetuses developing properly.
 
However, Mr Santos stressed there had been no Zika-linked microcephaly reported in Colombia so far, which can cause babies to be born with abnormally small heads and brains.
 
During a televised news conference with health officials, the president warned there may be up to 1,000 cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome as a result of the crisis.
 
That rare condition – in which the body’s immune system attacks the nerves – can cause paralysis, and some South American nations have linked it to the Zika virus.
 
On Friday, it was confirmed that three people had died in Colombia after contracting the Zika virus – in what was believed to be the first time health officials had directly blamed the disease for causing fatalities. 
 
Another six deaths are currently being investigated.
 
Martha Lucia Ospina, the director of Colombia’s national health institute, has warned the number of deaths will rise.
 
Colombia has begun to wage a battle against mosquitoes – and families in rural communities are receiving help to fumigate their homes and get rid of stagnant water.
 
An estimated 80% of those who develop the Zika virus do not have symptoms – which means the true number of people currently infected in Colombia could actually number between 80,000 and 100,000.
 
Those who are symptomatic usually develop a fever, red eyes and rashes.
 
The UN has called for women to receive increased access to abortion over fears of severe birth defects.
 
Brazil, where the virus is most prevalent, said Zika had been detected in urine and saliva, and officials there and in the US warned even kissing could potentially spread the disease.
 
The World Health Organisation has declared an international emergency and warned Zika could infect up to four million people in the Americas and spread worldwide.
Courtesy of Sky News

MAGNITUDE 2.3 AUSTRIA

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=487023

Subject To Change

Depth: 7 km

Distances: 43 km E of Vaduz, Liechtenstein / pop: 5,197 / local time: 16:38:00.1 2016-02-06
14 km W of Sankt Anton am Arlberg, Austria / pop: 2,848 / local time: 16:38:00.1 2016-02-06


Global viewRegional view

MEGA DIP SPIKES ON THE WEAK MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 03:30, 04:00, 11:45 HRS UTC

**VERY URGENT**
  MEGA DIP SPIKES ON THE WEAK MAGNETOSPHERE @ APPROX 03:30, 04:00, 11:45 HRS UTC. FURTHER EARTHQUAKES, VOLCANO ACTIVITY & ADVERSE WEATHER PATTERNS WILL BE GREATLY INFLUENCED BY THE COSMIC RAYS STRIKING THE EARTH’S CORE

***BE ALERT***

Magnetogram 06.02.16  11.43 hrs UTC

MAGNITUDE 2.3 NEAR COAST OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=486983

Subject To Change

Depth: 23 km

Distances: 45 km S of Adelaide, Australia / pop: 1,074,159 / local time: 19:51:17.0 2016-02-06
11 km E of Mount Compass, Australia / pop: 1,050 / local time: 19:51:17.0 2016-02-06


Global viewRegional view

MAGNITUDE 5.1 FIJI REGION

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=486902

Subject To Change

Depth: 10 km

Distances: 388 km W of Suva, Fiji / pop: 77,366 / local time: 16:51:34.9 2016-02-06
273 km W of Nadi, Fiji / pop: 42,284 / local time: 16:51:34.9 2016-02-06

Global viewRegional view

MAGNITUDE 5.5 FIJI REGION

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=486870

Subject To Change

Depth: 10 km

Distances: 391 km W of Suva, Fiji / pop: 77,366 / local time: 13:39:17.8 2016-02-06
276 km W of Nadi, Fiji / pop: 42,284 / local time: 13:39:17.8 2016-02-06

Global viewRegional view

6 dead Whales have washed ashore along the coast of East England, UK

Whale on Norfolk beach
The whale on Thursday. The six animals that have washed up on British beaches have all been males. Photograph: Maritime and Coastguard Agency/PA
Another sperm whale has become stranded on the east coast of England, the sixth to wash up on British shores in recent weeks.
 
The huge mammal washed up at Hunstanton beach in Norfolk and died on Thursday evening, according to British Divers Marine Life Rescue (BDMLR).
 
Stephen Marsh, operations manager for BDMLR, said there was nothing the volunteers could do due to the size and weight of the animal.
 
“It’s a sperm whale, another male. It’s the 29th stranding we’ve had in Europe in the last couple of weeks,” he said.
 
Before the whale died, he added: “We had two in Germany last night, one in France on Tuesday night. It’s a live stranding but it’s unlikely to survive. The tide may well lift it but we don’t think it would survive another stranding if it came back in.
 
“There’s nothing we can do; it’s likely to be between 25 and 30 tonnes. We can’t lift it, we can’t roll it, the vets can’t put it out of its misery. The body will be breaking down and releasing toxins, causing organ failure. It’s a very sad case but we will have to let nature take its course.”
 
Kate Dunbar, a local councillor who has been at the scene, told Sky News how volunteers were trying to bring the whale relief by covering it in water. “They’ve used a digger and dug a hole in the sand, the water has been welling in it and people have been back and forth with buckets of water to pour over the whale to make it more comfortable. It’s a very sad sight.”
 
Although high tide arrived at Hunstanton beach about 2pm on Thursday afternoon, the whale did not recover.
 
Once the animal is out of the water, “it is already dying”, Marsh said. There were specific problems with beached sperm whales “who cannot be moved, are in a pool of their own blood … probably blocking a lung”, BDMLR said.
 
Coastguards received a call at 7.30am on Thursday alerting them that the 14-metre whale had beached itself, the Maritime and Coastal Agency confirmed.
 
Scott Baldry had been working at the nearby Le Strange Arms with a friend when he saw people gathering at the area around 9am and said: “It is not often that you see a whale on the beach and when we got closer it became apparent it was a sperm whale. We could see it was still breathing and the fin was moving.”
 
A spokesperson for the Maritime and Coastal Agency said: “They are magnificent creatures but we’re just advising people to keep a safe distance, especially if the whale is still alive, it will cause distress to the animal.”
 
The latest stranding comes after a whale washed up at Hunstanton beach on 23 January, and three whale carcasses were hauled away from a beach near Skegness a day later.
 
On 25 January, a fifth whale was found stranded at Wainfleet. Experts believe the whales stranded on the east coast of England were probably from the same as the 12 that washed up last month on the coastlines in Germany and the Netherlands.
 
The six whales that washed up on British beaches have all been males. Marsh said: “The females and calves stay in warmer waters and the males leave as they become sexually active and form bachelor pods. They will then go back to the warmer areas on an annual basis to mate.
 
“We don’t know if they were trying to migrate down to the tropics but there’s no sign yet of any manmade activity that would cause them to come in, but that is being investigated.”
 
Rob Deaville, project manager at the UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme and the lead pathologist examining the previous beached Lincolnshire whales, had said it was “reasonable to assume” that the pods entered the North Sea together in the hunt for food.
 
“The question that’s left still hanging is why they came in the North Sea in the first place and whether the French, the German events are all connected in some way,” he said in January.
 
“I think it’s reasonable to assume that the pods – because there can be more than one pod – came in at the same time, given the spatial and temporal stranding events. I think that’s a reasonable assumption to make.”
 
The whale is said to be 1.5 miles out on the sand and the coastguard is also in attendance. Sperm whales are deep sea creatures, are the largest-toothed whales, feed on squid and octopus and can easily become disoriented if they get into shallow water.
 
Jeremy Littlewood, of UK coastguard, confirmed this was the sixth whale beaching. He said the beach would be cordoned off later on Thursday, adding: “It is obviously a very distressing scene and we would advise members of the public, for their own safety, to keep at a safe distance.
 
“We have informed the receiver of wreck and the Zoological Society of London,” he said.
Courtesy of theguardian.com

8 more dead whales found along coast of Friedrichskoog, Germany

Sombre: Eight sperm whales were washed up on this beach near the northern town of Friedrichskoog in Germany  
Eight dead sperm whales have died after they were washed up on a German beach today, taking the total number of dead whales to 23 after a devastating number of beachings during the past month across northern Europe.
 
The eight whales found near the northern town of Friedrichskoog were young bulls, around the same age as the animals discovered three weeks ago at various North Sea spots.
 
They were lying close to each other in the mudflats of a restricted area of the Wadden Sea national park, the Schleswig-Holstein regional environmental authority said in a statement.
Shocking: At least 23 whales have been stranded across the coastline of northern Europe and may have come from a single whale pod
Since the 1990s, a total of 82 sperm wales have been found stranded in the Wadden Sea in Denmark, the Netherlands and Germany.
 
The sperm whale is the largest of the toothed whales, and the largest toothed predator.It can measure up to 20 metres (67 feet) long and weigh over 50 tonnes.
Bleak scene: The creatures are male and about the same age as a number of others who have washed up on the coast of northern Europe over the last few weeks
‘The males of this population spend their winters in the north Atlantic.During their migrations, individual animals mistakenly wind up in the shallow and nutrient-poor North Sea,’ the authority said.
 
The shallow water makes it difficult for them to use their acoustic orientation to navigate and many become beached.
 
Wildlife protection groups also blame the underwater noise from sea traffic and oil platforms for interfering with acoustic signals.
Huge: There are various theories why the whales end up in the North Sea rather than the Atlantic - but the nutrient-poor waters can prove catastrophic for them
The devastating news comes as three of the dead sperm whales which were washed up on a British beach were covered in sand to stop them being moved by the tide and later taken to a landfill site to rot.
 
The majestic creatures are thought to have died at sea before beaching at Skegness in Lincolnshire and have since become something of a gory tourist attraction, with people taking selfies with the corpses and some scavengers even attempting to cut off ‘trophies’ from the creatures.
 
East Lindsey District Council Council workers covered up the bodies with sand to stop them being moved by the high tide and a spokesman confirmed they will then be taken to a landfill site.
 
‘We are well rehearsed when it comes to removing whales from the beach, we have had a few down the years including one which is bigger,’ a council spokesman said. ‘The whale at Lagoon Walk, which was further out on its own, moved overnight in the high tide so it is now further up the beach.
 
‘We are preparing to move the whales, but it won’t be today. Today, we are bringing in tractors to cover the whales in sand so they don’t move again.
 
‘Because there are three of them we need to find landfill that’s deep enough. We are almost there but we have to do it properly.
 
‘We are putting sand on them this afternoon because if we don’t they could move further along the beach where it might be more difficult to reach them.’
 
The bodies of the whales were cordoned off by council workers in a bid to protect the carcasses as they are examined by scientists trying to work out why they died.
East Lindsey District Council Council workers began covering up the whales' bodies with sand to stop them being moved by the high tide and a spokesman confirmed they will then be taken to a landfill site
Courtesy of dailymail.co.uk

36 TONS of fish have died in farms, due to ‘Red Tide’ in Hong Kong

Thousands of dead fish have been found in the Shing Mun River in Sha Tin. Photos: SCMP Pictures
Thousands of dead fish have been found in the Shing Mun River in Sha Tin. Photos: SCMP Pictures
A surge in a rare but harmful species of fish-killing red tides has devastated stocks in Hong Kong waters this winter in what is described as an unprecedented disaster for fish farmers.
 
Virtually all reports of the algal bloom involved the karenia papilionacea or karenia mikimotoi species, both of which are harmful to fish, with the latter a proven killer due to its effects on the gill tissues of fish and their breathing systems.
 
A Post review of statistics on the Agricultural, Fisheries and Conservation Department’s Red Tide Database from last November to the end of January indicate that most red tide reports were concentrated around Tolo Harbour and Long Harbour in the eastern New Territories.
 
The red tides have been linked to a massive fish kill in the area. Since late December, more than 36 tonnes of fish have died off mariculture zones in Kau Lau Wan, Yim Tin Tsai, Sham Wan, Yung Shue Au, Lo Fu Wat and Tap Mun.
 
Red tides, or algal blooms, are areas of seawater discoloured – brown, pink or red – by large concentrations of microorganisms that may deplete levels of dissolved oxygen. Sightings usually peak in the spring.
 
While there were more reports of red tides in the same period of 2014-15, distribution was more or less evenly spread, with just as many sightings around Lantau Island, Lamma Island and Tung Wan. But the red tides that winter were nearly all formedby the noctiluca scintillans species, which is non-toxic and commonly found in Hong Kong waters.
 
The situation has been serious enough to prompt the government to launch an emergency relief fund for mariculturists affected.
 
“I’ve lost about four tonnes of fish so far,” said Yim Tin Tsai fish farmer Lee Muk-kan, one of 222 applicants to the fund so far. “Yesterday I looked and I had two fish left.”
 
The vice-chairman of the New Territories Fishermen Fraternity Association, Chan Mei-tak, said the scale and severity of the fish deaths was unlike anything he had ever seen and possibly on par with the disaster in 1998, when a red tide killed 80 per cent of the stock at fish farms across Hong Kong.
 
“It is an unprecedented and unnatural disaster,” he said. “The issue isn’t about the dead fish now, it’s about fish farms closing.”
 
Chan estimated the mariculture industry had suffered losses of “more than HK$100 million” in just a month.
 
An ecotoxicologist at the Hong Kong Institute of Education, Professor Rudolph Wu Shiu-sun, said it was hard to explain why the harmful algae blooms were forming this year, but red tides were formed under precise conditions. Variables included the ratio of nitrates and phosphates, commonly found in wastewater, and the sea temperature.
 
An expert in aquatic toxicology at Chinese University, Professor Chan King-ming, said it was possible the species may have been “transferred” to the Tolo area by marine vessels from Yantian port further north in Shenzhen.
 
Tai Po district councillor Wong Yung-kan, a former lawmaker for the fisheries sector, said the mass deaths began a few weeks after a massive bluish-green discharge was found in the Shing Mun River in Sha Tin in December. He believed there was a link between the two events. He believed there was a link between the two events.
 
“In 1998, red tides killed fish everywhere, but this time it’s all happening in the Tolo Harbour area,” he said. “Something is not right.”
 
Since November there have been multiple reports of dead fish in the river. But the government has ruled out any connection between river pollution and red tides.
 
Food and health chief Dr Ko Wing-man said red tides were a “natural phenomenon” and there were “no measures to prevent the occurrence or spread”. He did however agree that there was room for the red tide alert and monitoring mechanism to be improved.
 
The Environmental Protection Department said it would keep up surveillance of planktonic algae in the river with preliminary results of a new batch of samples expected for release this week. Previous tests have found no toxic algae or “suspicious sources” in the watercourse.
 
The Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department said it would step up real-time monitoring of water quality at all 26 fish culture zones.
Courtesy of scmp.com