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TSUNAMI THREAT WARNING BULLETIN ISSUED: VANUATU

Tsunami Alert

TSUNAMI THREAT WARNING BULLETIN ISSUED: VANUATU

Courtesy of https://www.tsunami.gov/

34 earthquakes rattle Mauna Loa, world’s largest active volcano, Hawaii and scientists say eruption is possible

The Big Island of Hawaii, home to the world’s largest active volcano, Mauna Loa, was rocked by 34 earthquakes on Sunday. While most of the earthquakes were low in magnitude, and none were strong enough to cause a tsunami, scientists warned citizens that an eruption from Mauna Loa could be possible in the near future.

“While an eruption of Mauna Loa is not imminent, now is the time to revisit personal eruption plans,” said a recent press release from scientists with the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. “Similar to preparing for hurricane season, having an eruption plan in advance helps during an emergency.”

The largest active volcano on Earth, Mauna Loa reaches a height of 13,681 feet above sea level, and 3 miles below the Central Pacific to the ocean floor. “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain.” The volcano covers half of the island.

The Big Island of Hawaii is also home to three other active volcanoes: Kilauea, Mauna Kea and Hualalai. Kilauea has been erupting since December.

Concern from scientists stems from the rate at which deformation, or changes to the volcano’s surface, are affecting Mauna Loa, as well as its seismicity, or the frequency of earthquakes. The Big Island has had more than 744 earthquakes in the last of a magnitude 1.5 or greater in the last 30 days.

U.S. Geological Survey scientists recommended residents have response plans and a “go-bag” ready in the case of an evacuation order.

“Nowadays, people pack ‘go’ bags containing essential items in case you have to leave your house under an evacuation order,” the USGS said. “You may want to include important documents, like your birth certificate, deeds, legal papers, and medications.”

According to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times since 1843. Its last eruption lasted from March 25 to April 15, 1984.

Courtesy of thehill.com

https://tinyurl.com/55xrjfm4

Huge Fireball Meteor over Alaska Sets off Volcano Warning System 360 Miles Away

Fireball Alert

A huge “fireball” meteor that lit up skies across west Alaska also set off newly installed sensors for detecting volcanic activity, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has said.

The event, which took place on October 15, triggered six of the sensors’ alarms at a new monitoring station on the Kenai Peninsula. The sensors are built to detect low-frequency sound waves in the atmosphere during volcanic activity, but in this case they picked up waves coming from the meteor that had streaked across the sky around 360 miles away.

In a Facebook post, the USGS said the meteor also triggered an alarm at Mount Spurr—a large, active volcano that sits around 80 miles from Anchorage that last erupted in 1992. However, as other monitoring systems also picked up on the waves, “it quickly became clear that this was not activity at Mount Spur,” the post said.

Scientists with the USGS Alaska Volcano Observatory worked with researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute to investigate the cause. They found the meteor passed over Alaska around 40 miles from the Athabaskan community of Kaltag, which sits on the Yukon River.

In a blog post for the American Geophysical Union, UAF science writer Ned Rozell said witnesses reported the fireball in regions hundreds of miles apart. One resident of Ruby described it as an “enormous ball of light in the sky,” saying it was moving north to south. Another resident said it looked like “fireworks” that split into four dots.

David Fee, head of the infrasound program at UAF’s Geophysical Institute and researcher with the AVO, said he believes the meteor exploded somewhere east of Kaltag. “I typically don’t work on meteors, but they are often really nice infrasound sources to help better understand the performance of our networks, and I think provide valuable information on meteors and bolides themselves,” he said.

Courtesy of newsweek.com

https://tinyurl.com/yygt6h3w

TSUNAMI THREAT WARNING BULLETIN ISSUED FOR ECUADOR, MEXICO #Tsunami #earthquake #Ecuador #Mexico #MajorAlert

Tsunami Alert
TSUNAMI THREAT WARNING BULLETIN
ISSUED FOR ECUADOR, MEXICO DUE TO
MAJOR EARTHQUAKE MAGNITUDE 7.4
DEPTH 10 KM OAXACA, MEXICO
COURTESY OF USGS

MAGNITUDE 2.1 LONG VALLEY AREA, CALIFORNIA, USA

https://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=626201

Subject to change

Depth: 4 km

Distances: 403 km N of Los Angeles, United States / pop: 3,793,000 / local time: 05:13:51.0 2017-10-25
184 km SE of Carson City, United States / pop: 55,300 / local time: 05:13:51.0 2017-10-25
92 km E of Mariposa, United States / pop: 2,200 / local time: 05:13:51.0 2017-10-25
3 km E of Mammoth Lakes, United States / pop: 8,300 / local time: 05:13:51.0 2017-10-25

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YELLOWSTONE MAGNITUDE 2.5 UTAH, USA

Distances: 607 km N of Phoenix, United States / pop: 1,446,000 / local time: 18:27:15.0 2017-09-28
204 km S of Salt Lake City, United States / pop: 187,000 / local time: 19:27:15.0 2017-09-28
21 km NE of Richfield, United States / pop: 7,600 / local time: 19:27:15.0 2017-09-28
1 km SW of Aurora, United States / pop: 1,100 / local time: 19:27:15.0 2017-09-28

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YELLOWSTONE REGION MAGNITUDE 2.7 YELLOWSTONE NAT. PARK, WYOMING, USA

https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/uu60203937#executive

Subject To Change

Depth: 7 km

Distances: 732 km S of Calgary, Canada / pop: 1,020,000 / local time: 02:02:02.1 2017-06-16
215 km S of Helena, United States / pop: 28,200 / local time: 02:02:02.1 2017-06-16
99 km S of Bozeman, United States / pop: 37,300 / local time: 02:02:02.1 2017-06-16
15 km N of West Yellowstone, United States / pop: 1,300 / local time: 02:02:02.1 2017-06-16

 

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Major earthquake ‘certain’ to hit Southern California, study says

‘No getting out of this’: Major earthquake ‘certain’ to hit Southern California, study says
San Andreas fault © Francois Gohier / http://www.globallookpress.com
It is simply a matter of time before a major earthquake hits Southern California, according to a new study by the US Geological Survey (USGS), which examined patterns of historic quakes. The only question is how long it will be before the ‘Big One’ strikes.
 
The study – the most extensive of its kind – examined a section of the San Andreas fault that runs along Interstate 5, near Frazier Mountain in northeast Kern County.
 
“One of the reasons why this location is of importance is because in Southern California, the Big Bend, Carrizo, and Mojave sections of the San Andreas Fault accommodate 50-70% of plate motion. This means that the seismic hazard is high,” according to Temblor. 
 
To understand the size and likelihood of future earthquakes striking the area, the researchers looked into the past, by digging more than 30 trenches to trace ancient temblors.
 
“To get 1,200 years of records, we have to do lots of excavations and go quite deep,” said the study’s lead author, USGS research geologist Kate Scharer, as quoted by the Los Angeles Times.
 
Scharer and her team found 10 major earthquakes over a 1,000-year period. They were able to date the temblors by examining charcoal and plant remains found at each horizon.
 
The most common magnitude found at the site was 7.5.
 
A 7.9 earthquake in 1857 – the last major temblor to strike – was so powerful that it caused the soil to liquefy and trees to sink and uproot. The shaking lasted between one and three minutes.
 
Since then, land on either side of the fault has been pushing against the other at a rate of more than 1in per year, accumulating energy which will be suddenly released in a major earthquake that would move land along the fault line by many feet.
 
A repeat of the 1857 quake could move the land as much as 20ft, damage aqueducts that ferry water into Southern California from the north, disrupt transmission lines, and damage Interstate 5.
 
Although the researchers noted that a big earthquake is certain, they couldn’t predict when it will happen because they “don’t happen like clockwork.”
 
For instance, while there was once a gap of just 20 years between two temblors, another pair saw a gap of 200 years between them.
 
The average interval between quakes was found to be approximately 100 years, meaning the gap separating today from the 1857 earthquake is already 60 years more than the average.
 
“Longer gaps have happened in the past, but we know they always do culminate in a large earthquake. There’s no getting out of this,” Scharer said.
 
She went on to urge similar studies to take place so that scientists can gain a greater understanding of the San Andreas Fault, in order to “properly design infrastructure, like highways, water, and power lines, so that it can survive the next earthquake.”
 
The San Andreas Fault extends roughly 1,300km (800 miles) through California. It has three segments, each with a varying degree of earthquake risk. The most significant is the southern segment, which passes within about 56km (35 miles) of Los Angeles.
Courtesy of rt.com

YELLOWSTONE REGION MAGNITUDE 2.6 UTAH, USA

http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/earthquake.php?id=516570

Subject To Change

Depth: 9 km

Distances: 403 km N of Phoenix, United States / pop: 1,445,632 / local time: 21:10:22.4 2016-07-04
34 km W of Kanab, United States / pop: 4,312 / local time: 22:10:22.4 2016-07-04
5 km E of Hildale, United States / pop: 2,726 / local time: 22:10:22.4 2016-07-04

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