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NEW CRATER! Huge Lava Flow on Iceland Volcano – Lava moving towards visitors

Large explosion reported at La Soufrière Volcano in St Vincent

The Trinidad-based Seismic Research Centre (SRC) of the University of the West Indies (UWI) today reported a “large explosion” at the La Soufriere volcano.

In a brief update posted on its website, the SRC said that its team monitoring the volcano, which erupted last Friday, “has observed a large explosion at approximately 4:15 am (local time) and pyroclastic density currents(flows) have been observed on the flanks of the volcano”.

The SRC said that it is continuing to monitor the situation and will update later.

Volcanologist Professor Richard Robertson yesterday warned that the ongoing eruption of La Soufriere volcano is in keeping with the events surrounding the 1902 eruption which claimed 1,600 lives at a time when early warning systems and evacuation capabilities were not as advanced.

Speaking on the state-owned NBC Radio, Professor Robertson, the lead scientist monitoring the volcano, said that while most people know of the 1979 eruption, what is currently happening at La Soufriere is more akin to more a century ago.

“The activity pattern we have currently is more similar to a 1902 type of eruption of that kind of scale, rather than a 1979 scale. The people who lived through 1979 know the kind of eruption we have had.

“What does that mean? It means, unfortunately, that it is likely going to cause more damage and destruction to St Vincent but it also means that there will always be a safe place in the south of the country, which might have a lot of ash every now and then, but you can still sustain life and limb and it would not — which is what we all worry about — get so big that it destroys the whole country. That currently doesn’t seem to be the case.”

Courtesy of jamaicaobserver.com

https://tinyurl.com/jafhwpjj

Explosive activity and volcanic ash continues at Fuego Volcano in Guatemala

Satellite image of Fuego volcano by (c) Google Earth View

Explosive activity continues with volcanic ash plumes at Fuego Volcano in Guatemala

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/2ce2bd8n

34 earthquakes rattle Mauna Loa, world’s largest active volcano, Hawaii and scientists say eruption is possible

The Big Island of Hawaii, home to the world’s largest active volcano, Mauna Loa, was rocked by 34 earthquakes on Sunday. While most of the earthquakes were low in magnitude, and none were strong enough to cause a tsunami, scientists warned citizens that an eruption from Mauna Loa could be possible in the near future.

“While an eruption of Mauna Loa is not imminent, now is the time to revisit personal eruption plans,” said a recent press release from scientists with the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. “Similar to preparing for hurricane season, having an eruption plan in advance helps during an emergency.”

The largest active volcano on Earth, Mauna Loa reaches a height of 13,681 feet above sea level, and 3 miles below the Central Pacific to the ocean floor. “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain.” The volcano covers half of the island.

The Big Island of Hawaii is also home to three other active volcanoes: Kilauea, Mauna Kea and Hualalai. Kilauea has been erupting since December.

Concern from scientists stems from the rate at which deformation, or changes to the volcano’s surface, are affecting Mauna Loa, as well as its seismicity, or the frequency of earthquakes. The Big Island has had more than 744 earthquakes in the last of a magnitude 1.5 or greater in the last 30 days.

U.S. Geological Survey scientists recommended residents have response plans and a “go-bag” ready in the case of an evacuation order.

“Nowadays, people pack ‘go’ bags containing essential items in case you have to leave your house under an evacuation order,” the USGS said. “You may want to include important documents, like your birth certificate, deeds, legal papers, and medications.”

According to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times since 1843. Its last eruption lasted from March 25 to April 15, 1984.

Courtesy of thehill.com

https://tinyurl.com/55xrjfm4

Natural Disaster Alert: Volcanic Ash in Barbados – U.S. Embassy Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean

The Barbados Meteorological Services issued a severe volcanic ash warning for the island on April 10, 2021. A thick plume of volcanic ash from the La Soufriere Volcano in St Vincent, which erupted on April 9, is currently affecting the island. Satellite imagery of the volcano continues to show a thick plume of ash traveling easterly towards Barbados. There have been reports of ash fall across the island, and Saharan dust haze also remains present, which will continue to reduce visibility and may cause respiratory problems, especially for those persons with pre-existing respiratory issues or allergies.

The Grantley Adams International Airport in Barbados is closed until at least 6 a.m. on April 11, 2021, due to the volcanic ash.

Actions to Take:

Remain vigilant and maintain active awareness of local conditions.
Limit outdoor activity and wear masks (N95 ideally) when outdoors
Close windows and use air filters if available indoors.
Persons with respiratory issues or allergies should ensure they have, close at hand, all prescribed relevant medications and inhalers in case of an emergency.
Use car headlights to assist with the reduced visibility and do not use the car’s ventilation system.
Monitor the Barbados Meteorological Services website for updates.

Courtesy of bb.usembassy.gov

https://tinyurl.com/cukh8r9p

Third lava stream cracks in Icelandic volcano

Photo Illustration

A third eruption fissure cracked open on April 6, in between the two already existing ones.

Drone footage filmed on Friday (April 9) showed the second fissure surrounded by a blanket of snow.

The volcano on the Reykjanes Peninsula, some 30 kilometres southwest of the capital Reykjavik, started to erupt on March 19 and has become a tourist attraction, drawing thousands of visitors.

Volcanologists have no idea how long the eruption will continue, saying it could stop soon or continue for years, possibly even decades.

Courtesy of news.yahoo.com

https://tinyurl.com/4mjp5u37

Second Strong Explosion At La Soufrière Volcano In St. Vincent Island, West Indies, Caribbean

Eruption column of the second explosion of Soufrière St. Vincent volcano this afternoon (image: UWISeismic Research / twitter)

A second strong explosion occurred this afternoon, around 2:45 pm, apparently similar in size as the one from the morning.

Volcanic Ash Advisory Center Washington reports an ash plume reaching 20,000 ft (7 km) altitude and moving SE. Images taken from the island confirm a tall ash column rising at least 4 km according to estimates from the volcano observatory.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/kbsj38xj

Iceland volcano Fagradalsfjall between capital & main airport ERUPTS, triggering halt to air traffic

Photo Illustration

A volcano has erupted in southwest Iceland following heavy seismic activity and a series of small earthquakes in the area. All inbound and outgoing flights have been halted amid the eruption.

The Fagradalsfjall volcano, located around 20 miles (32km) south of the country’s capital of Reykjavik, erupted late on Friday night, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office (ICO), which noted that all flights to and from the neighboring Keflavik International Airport had been paused.

A video captured from the Coast Guard helicopter and shared by the ICO showed a stream of glowing lava snaking down the mountain, with the office adding that the lava flow is only some 1.6 miles (2.6km) away from the town of Suðurstrandarvegur.

Photos of the eruption have circulated on social media, turning the night sky red.

Authorities from Keflavik were sent to assess the situation, the ICO said, while local media reported that a Coast Guard helicopter had also been dispatched to the area, bringing along two scientists to help determine next steps.

A local government spokesperson also announced that all main roads around the volcano had been closed “so that people do not get too close.”

Located on a peninsula in southwest Iceland, the volcano sits in a seismic hotspot which has seen some 40,000 small quakes since late February, putting the region on high alert for a volcanic episode. However, as noted by a local seismologist, activity in the area “died down almost completely” in the lead-up to Friday’s eruption.

Courtesy of rt.com

https://tinyurl.com/yc3rtfmh