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Live: More Incredible Eruption Scenes – Major Volcano Eruption – La Palma – Canary Islands

Large explosion reported at La Soufrière Volcano in St Vincent

The Trinidad-based Seismic Research Centre (SRC) of the University of the West Indies (UWI) today reported a “large explosion” at the La Soufriere volcano.

In a brief update posted on its website, the SRC said that its team monitoring the volcano, which erupted last Friday, “has observed a large explosion at approximately 4:15 am (local time) and pyroclastic density currents(flows) have been observed on the flanks of the volcano”.

The SRC said that it is continuing to monitor the situation and will update later.

Volcanologist Professor Richard Robertson yesterday warned that the ongoing eruption of La Soufriere volcano is in keeping with the events surrounding the 1902 eruption which claimed 1,600 lives at a time when early warning systems and evacuation capabilities were not as advanced.

Speaking on the state-owned NBC Radio, Professor Robertson, the lead scientist monitoring the volcano, said that while most people know of the 1979 eruption, what is currently happening at La Soufriere is more akin to more a century ago.

“The activity pattern we have currently is more similar to a 1902 type of eruption of that kind of scale, rather than a 1979 scale. The people who lived through 1979 know the kind of eruption we have had.

“What does that mean? It means, unfortunately, that it is likely going to cause more damage and destruction to St Vincent but it also means that there will always be a safe place in the south of the country, which might have a lot of ash every now and then, but you can still sustain life and limb and it would not — which is what we all worry about — get so big that it destroys the whole country. That currently doesn’t seem to be the case.”

Courtesy of jamaicaobserver.com

https://tinyurl.com/jafhwpjj

Third lava stream cracks in Icelandic volcano

Photo Illustration

A third eruption fissure cracked open on April 6, in between the two already existing ones.

Drone footage filmed on Friday (April 9) showed the second fissure surrounded by a blanket of snow.

The volcano on the Reykjanes Peninsula, some 30 kilometres southwest of the capital Reykjavik, started to erupt on March 19 and has become a tourist attraction, drawing thousands of visitors.

Volcanologists have no idea how long the eruption will continue, saying it could stop soon or continue for years, possibly even decades.

Courtesy of news.yahoo.com

https://tinyurl.com/4mjp5u37

Eruption With Lava Flow At Kilauea Volcano In Hawai’i

Lava fountains from the bottom of the deep pit crater in Kilauea’s Halema’uma crater, from the west rim of the collapse crater (image: HVO)

A new eruption started at Kilauea volcano in the evening of 20 Dec in Hawaii (local time). The volcano observatory reported:

“Shortly after approximately 9:30 p.m. HST, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) detected glow within Halemaʻumaʻu crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. An eruption has commenced within Kīlauea’s summit caldera. The situation is rapidly evolving and HVO will issue another statement when more information is available.”

During the past weeks, earthquakes had been more frequent under the caldera and the upper rift zone. They likely reflected magma intrusions at shallow level.

Shortly after the new eruption, observed less than two hours ago, a magnitude 4.3 quake struck the southern flank of the volcano, about 10 miles west of Kalapana. This quake might be related as a response to the new eruption, probably causing a small southwards movement of the southern flank of Kilauea, acting as adjustment for the additional space needed of the magma intrusion in the summit area.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/jc6svx3