Archive | Volcanic Lava RSS for this section

DR Congo orders Goma evacuation after Mount Nyiragongo erupts

Large explosion reported at La Soufrière Volcano in St Vincent

The Trinidad-based Seismic Research Centre (SRC) of the University of the West Indies (UWI) today reported a “large explosion” at the La Soufriere volcano.

In a brief update posted on its website, the SRC said that its team monitoring the volcano, which erupted last Friday, “has observed a large explosion at approximately 4:15 am (local time) and pyroclastic density currents(flows) have been observed on the flanks of the volcano”.

The SRC said that it is continuing to monitor the situation and will update later.

Volcanologist Professor Richard Robertson yesterday warned that the ongoing eruption of La Soufriere volcano is in keeping with the events surrounding the 1902 eruption which claimed 1,600 lives at a time when early warning systems and evacuation capabilities were not as advanced.

Speaking on the state-owned NBC Radio, Professor Robertson, the lead scientist monitoring the volcano, said that while most people know of the 1979 eruption, what is currently happening at La Soufriere is more akin to more a century ago.

“The activity pattern we have currently is more similar to a 1902 type of eruption of that kind of scale, rather than a 1979 scale. The people who lived through 1979 know the kind of eruption we have had.

“What does that mean? It means, unfortunately, that it is likely going to cause more damage and destruction to St Vincent but it also means that there will always be a safe place in the south of the country, which might have a lot of ash every now and then, but you can still sustain life and limb and it would not — which is what we all worry about — get so big that it destroys the whole country. That currently doesn’t seem to be the case.”

Courtesy of jamaicaobserver.com

https://tinyurl.com/jafhwpjj

Third lava stream cracks in Icelandic volcano

Photo Illustration

A third eruption fissure cracked open on April 6, in between the two already existing ones.

Drone footage filmed on Friday (April 9) showed the second fissure surrounded by a blanket of snow.

The volcano on the Reykjanes Peninsula, some 30 kilometres southwest of the capital Reykjavik, started to erupt on March 19 and has become a tourist attraction, drawing thousands of visitors.

Volcanologists have no idea how long the eruption will continue, saying it could stop soon or continue for years, possibly even decades.

Courtesy of news.yahoo.com

https://tinyurl.com/4mjp5u37

Iceland volcano Fagradalsfjall between capital & main airport ERUPTS, triggering halt to air traffic

Photo Illustration

A volcano has erupted in southwest Iceland following heavy seismic activity and a series of small earthquakes in the area. All inbound and outgoing flights have been halted amid the eruption.

The Fagradalsfjall volcano, located around 20 miles (32km) south of the country’s capital of Reykjavik, erupted late on Friday night, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office (ICO), which noted that all flights to and from the neighboring Keflavik International Airport had been paused.

A video captured from the Coast Guard helicopter and shared by the ICO showed a stream of glowing lava snaking down the mountain, with the office adding that the lava flow is only some 1.6 miles (2.6km) away from the town of Suðurstrandarvegur.

Photos of the eruption have circulated on social media, turning the night sky red.

Authorities from Keflavik were sent to assess the situation, the ICO said, while local media reported that a Coast Guard helicopter had also been dispatched to the area, bringing along two scientists to help determine next steps.

A local government spokesperson also announced that all main roads around the volcano had been closed “so that people do not get too close.”

Located on a peninsula in southwest Iceland, the volcano sits in a seismic hotspot which has seen some 40,000 small quakes since late February, putting the region on high alert for a volcanic episode. However, as noted by a local seismologist, activity in the area “died down almost completely” in the lead-up to Friday’s eruption.

Courtesy of rt.com

https://tinyurl.com/yc3rtfmh

Eruption With Lava Flow At Kilauea Volcano In Hawai’i

Lava fountains from the bottom of the deep pit crater in Kilauea’s Halema’uma crater, from the west rim of the collapse crater (image: HVO)

A new eruption started at Kilauea volcano in the evening of 20 Dec in Hawaii (local time). The volcano observatory reported:

“Shortly after approximately 9:30 p.m. HST, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) detected glow within Halemaʻumaʻu crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. An eruption has commenced within Kīlauea’s summit caldera. The situation is rapidly evolving and HVO will issue another statement when more information is available.”

During the past weeks, earthquakes had been more frequent under the caldera and the upper rift zone. They likely reflected magma intrusions at shallow level.

Shortly after the new eruption, observed less than two hours ago, a magnitude 4.3 quake struck the southern flank of the volcano, about 10 miles west of Kalapana. This quake might be related as a response to the new eruption, probably causing a small southwards movement of the southern flank of Kilauea, acting as adjustment for the additional space needed of the magma intrusion in the summit area.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/jc6svx3

Strong Strombolian-to-Vulcanian Explosive Activity Continues at Fuego Volcano in Guatemala

Vulcanic explosion generated incandescent material that slid down along the slopes of the volcano (image: @newsandnature01/twitter)

The activity of the volcano continues at moderately high levels during the past week.

INSIVUMEH reported that a moderate-to-strong strombolian-to-vulcanian-type explosions erupted at regular intervals of 6 to 8 per hour. Plume of ash rose to an altitude of 4,700 ft (15,420 m) and extending about 10 km to the N-NE of the volcano.

A strong vulcanic explosion occurred on 28 November at 02:11 local time showering the summit cone with glowing lava bombs ejected to an approximate height of 300 m above the crater.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y2fashb5

Moderate Explosion at Villarrica Volcano, Chile

Moderate explosion from Villarica volcano on 5 December (image: @conaf_minagri/twitter)

Occasional explosions of the volcano continue.

On 5 December at 18:44 local time the volcano observatory SERNAGEOMIN recorded a moderate explosion associated with long-period (LP) earthquake.

An ash plume rose 524 ft (160 m) above the summit and drifted south-southeast and caused fresh ash deposits on the snow cover visible in the images.

The small lava pond continues to be active in the inner active vent. There is a 500 m exclusion zone around the main crater in place.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/yxoanjko

New eruption at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano in (La Réunion, France), Indian Ocean

New eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano this morning (image: OVPF/IPGP)

A new eruption started at the volcano this morning. At around 2.28 am local time, the seismic network of the observatory detected a seismic crisis, typical sign of magma pushing its way towards the surface. Other instruments detected rapid local ground deformation, another tell-tale sign of an impending eruption.

At around 4.40 am, volcanic tremor was recorded by the instruments, reflecting now a continuous flow of magma towards the surface. The first lava probably came out shortly after, at around 4.50-4.55 am. 3 fissures opened at altitude between 2190 and 2300 m on the southwestern flank of the summit cone and started to erupt small lava fountains, about 15 m tall, from a chain of vents.

The eruption has been producing multiple lava flows that started to descend slowly on the flanks. By the time of first visual observations made by scientists on an aerial survey a few hours later, the most advanced lava flow front had descended to 2120 m altitude. Given this rather low rate of advance and low height of lava fountains, the discharge rate of this eruption seems rather low compared to most previous eruptions of Piton de la Fournaise.

Today’s eruption marks the third of the volcano in 2020, after eruptions in February and April this year. It followed a period of frequent seismic unrest, last detected during the morning of 4 Dec. These preceding periods likely reflect intrusions and the recharging of shallow magma reservoirs, events that often build up to eruptions like the current one. Piton de la Fournaise is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and typically erupts several times each year.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y3kjz7ps