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NEW CRATER! Huge Lava Flow on Iceland Volcano – Lava moving towards visitors

34 earthquakes rattle Mauna Loa, world’s largest active volcano, Hawaii and scientists say eruption is possible

The Big Island of Hawaii, home to the world’s largest active volcano, Mauna Loa, was rocked by 34 earthquakes on Sunday. While most of the earthquakes were low in magnitude, and none were strong enough to cause a tsunami, scientists warned citizens that an eruption from Mauna Loa could be possible in the near future.

“While an eruption of Mauna Loa is not imminent, now is the time to revisit personal eruption plans,” said a recent press release from scientists with the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. “Similar to preparing for hurricane season, having an eruption plan in advance helps during an emergency.”

The largest active volcano on Earth, Mauna Loa reaches a height of 13,681 feet above sea level, and 3 miles below the Central Pacific to the ocean floor. “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain.” The volcano covers half of the island.

The Big Island of Hawaii is also home to three other active volcanoes: Kilauea, Mauna Kea and Hualalai. Kilauea has been erupting since December.

Concern from scientists stems from the rate at which deformation, or changes to the volcano’s surface, are affecting Mauna Loa, as well as its seismicity, or the frequency of earthquakes. The Big Island has had more than 744 earthquakes in the last of a magnitude 1.5 or greater in the last 30 days.

U.S. Geological Survey scientists recommended residents have response plans and a “go-bag” ready in the case of an evacuation order.

“Nowadays, people pack ‘go’ bags containing essential items in case you have to leave your house under an evacuation order,” the USGS said. “You may want to include important documents, like your birth certificate, deeds, legal papers, and medications.”

According to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times since 1843. Its last eruption lasted from March 25 to April 15, 1984.

Courtesy of thehill.com

https://tinyurl.com/55xrjfm4

Mount Etna spews smoke and ashes in spectacular new eruption

Volcano Alert

Photo Illustration

Mount Etna, one of the world’s most active volcanoes, belched smoke and ashes in a new eruption on Tuesday, but Italian authorities said it posed no danger to the surrounding villages.

“We’ve seen worse,” the head of the INGV National Institute for Geophysics and Vulcanology in the nearby city of Catania, Stefano Branco, told Italian news agency AGI.

Estimating that the eruption from Etna’s southeastern crater began late Tuesday afternoon, Branco insisted that the latest burst of activity was “not at all worrying”.

Nevertheless, with small stones and ashes raining down, authorities decided to close Catania’s international airport.

The emergency authorities said on their Twitter account that they were monitoring the situation closely in the three villages at the foot of the volcano — Linguaglossa, Fornazzo and Milo.

Images showed a spectacular rose-coloured plume of ashes above the snow-capped summit, but the cloud had largely dissipated by nightfall, while lava flows continued to glow.

At 3,324 metres (nearly 11,000 feet), Etna is the tallest active volcano in Europe and has erupted frequently in the past 500,000 years.

Courtesy of france24.com

https://tinyurl.com/yq3dk4gy

Explosive Activity Continues With Volcanic Ash At Sabancaya Volcano In Peru

Volcano Alert

Photo Illustration

Explosive activity continues. Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) Buenos Aires warned about a volcanic ash plume that rose up to estimated 22000 ft (6700 m) altitude or flight level 220 and is moving at 10 kts in NW direction.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/211jsmp1

Strong Strombolian-to-Vulcanian Explosive Activity Continues at Fuego Volcano in Guatemala

Vulcanic explosion generated incandescent material that slid down along the slopes of the volcano (image: @newsandnature01/twitter)

The activity of the volcano continues at moderately high levels during the past week.

INSIVUMEH reported that a moderate-to-strong strombolian-to-vulcanian-type explosions erupted at regular intervals of 6 to 8 per hour. Plume of ash rose to an altitude of 4,700 ft (15,420 m) and extending about 10 km to the N-NE of the volcano.

A strong vulcanic explosion occurred on 28 November at 02:11 local time showering the summit cone with glowing lava bombs ejected to an approximate height of 300 m above the crater.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y2fashb5

Moderate Explosion at Villarrica Volcano, Chile

Moderate explosion from Villarica volcano on 5 December (image: @conaf_minagri/twitter)

Occasional explosions of the volcano continue.

On 5 December at 18:44 local time the volcano observatory SERNAGEOMIN recorded a moderate explosion associated with long-period (LP) earthquake.

An ash plume rose 524 ft (160 m) above the summit and drifted south-southeast and caused fresh ash deposits on the snow cover visible in the images.

The small lava pond continues to be active in the inner active vent. There is a 500 m exclusion zone around the main crater in place.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/yxoanjko

New eruption at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano in (La Réunion, France), Indian Ocean

New eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano this morning (image: OVPF/IPGP)

A new eruption started at the volcano this morning. At around 2.28 am local time, the seismic network of the observatory detected a seismic crisis, typical sign of magma pushing its way towards the surface. Other instruments detected rapid local ground deformation, another tell-tale sign of an impending eruption.

At around 4.40 am, volcanic tremor was recorded by the instruments, reflecting now a continuous flow of magma towards the surface. The first lava probably came out shortly after, at around 4.50-4.55 am. 3 fissures opened at altitude between 2190 and 2300 m on the southwestern flank of the summit cone and started to erupt small lava fountains, about 15 m tall, from a chain of vents.

The eruption has been producing multiple lava flows that started to descend slowly on the flanks. By the time of first visual observations made by scientists on an aerial survey a few hours later, the most advanced lava flow front had descended to 2120 m altitude. Given this rather low rate of advance and low height of lava fountains, the discharge rate of this eruption seems rather low compared to most previous eruptions of Piton de la Fournaise.

Today’s eruption marks the third of the volcano in 2020, after eruptions in February and April this year. It followed a period of frequent seismic unrest, last detected during the morning of 4 Dec. These preceding periods likely reflect intrusions and the recharging of shallow magma reservoirs, events that often build up to eruptions like the current one. Piton de la Fournaise is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and typically erupts several times each year.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y3kjz7ps

Lava Flow Increases at Pacaya Volcano in Guatemala

Flank-to-lateral eruption of Pacaya volcano continues (image: @William_Chigna/twitter)

The effusive-explosive eruption of the volcano continues.

The lava flow on the southwestern eruptive fissure has increased in length, currently about 525 m long.

Weak-to-moderate strombolian-type explosions continue from the Mackenney summit crater with ejecta thrown at an approximate height of 20 and 50 meters.

The seismic instruments recorded internal tremor associated with explosions and lava flow and magma rising within the volcano edifice.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/yxar5r5e

Moderate-to-strong explosion at Sakurajima Volcano in Kyushu, Japan

Strong explosion from Sakurajima volcano today (image: Sakurajima webcam)

A moderate-to-strong vulcanian-type explosion was observed by surveillance cameras at 11:44 local time today.

A large ash content erupted to an altitude of 7,000 ft (2,133 m) and drifted E. The explosion likely generated a small pumice-and-ash flows caused by eruption column collapse, as can be seen in the image.

The explosive activity of the volcano is characterized by sporadic vulcanian-type eruptions from the summit crater during the past two months.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/yyvq9rsu