Archive | Pyroclastic Flows RSS for this section

NEW CRATER! Huge Lava Flow on Iceland Volcano – Lava moving towards visitors

Large explosion reported at La Soufrière Volcano in St Vincent

The Trinidad-based Seismic Research Centre (SRC) of the University of the West Indies (UWI) today reported a “large explosion” at the La Soufriere volcano.

In a brief update posted on its website, the SRC said that its team monitoring the volcano, which erupted last Friday, “has observed a large explosion at approximately 4:15 am (local time) and pyroclastic density currents(flows) have been observed on the flanks of the volcano”.

The SRC said that it is continuing to monitor the situation and will update later.

Volcanologist Professor Richard Robertson yesterday warned that the ongoing eruption of La Soufriere volcano is in keeping with the events surrounding the 1902 eruption which claimed 1,600 lives at a time when early warning systems and evacuation capabilities were not as advanced.

Speaking on the state-owned NBC Radio, Professor Robertson, the lead scientist monitoring the volcano, said that while most people know of the 1979 eruption, what is currently happening at La Soufriere is more akin to more a century ago.

“The activity pattern we have currently is more similar to a 1902 type of eruption of that kind of scale, rather than a 1979 scale. The people who lived through 1979 know the kind of eruption we have had.

“What does that mean? It means, unfortunately, that it is likely going to cause more damage and destruction to St Vincent but it also means that there will always be a safe place in the south of the country, which might have a lot of ash every now and then, but you can still sustain life and limb and it would not — which is what we all worry about — get so big that it destroys the whole country. That currently doesn’t seem to be the case.”

Courtesy of jamaicaobserver.com

https://tinyurl.com/jafhwpjj

Hundreds flee as Mount Semeru spews lava and ash in Java, Indonesia

Volcano Alert

Photo Illustration

Hundreds of Indonesians have fled their villages after a rumbling volcano spewed hot ash thousands of metres into the air and belched lava down its crater.

Mount Semeru on Java island spouted the towering column on Tuesday, prompting a call for around 500 people to temporarily evacuate their homes.

Footage from the scene showed dead livestock covered by pyroclastic flows — a fast-moving mixture of hot gas and volcanic material — as steaming debris flowed into a nearby river.

Local disaster agency chief Agus Triono warned on Wednesday that residents could still be at risk as heavy rains threatened to trigger more volcanic flows from the still-spewing crater.

The eruption came days after Mount Ili Lewotolok roared back to life on the far eastern end of the archipelago nation.

Around 6,000 residents fled to shelters there after the crater ejected a thick tower of debris four kilometres (2.5 miles) into the sky on Sunday, triggering a flight warning and the closure of a local airport.

There were no reports of injuries or deaths.

Indonesia is home to about 130 active volcanoes due to its position on the “Ring of Fire”, a belt of tectonic plate boundaries circling the Pacific Ocean where frequent seismic activity occurs.

In late 2018, a volcano in the strait between Java and Sumatra islands erupted, causing an underwater landslide that unleashed a tsunami which killed more than 400 people.

Courtesy of macaubusiness.com

https://tinyurl.com/y3by8hhv

Incandescent Avalanches at Sinabung Volcano in Sumatra, Indonesia

Incandescent avalanches from Sinabung volcano on 28 October (image: Firdaus Surbakti/twitter)

The activity of the volcano has remained essentially unchanged and characterized by pyroclastic flows over the past days.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y5d23s6f

Pyroclastic flows continue at Sinabung Volcano in Sumatra, Indonesia

Pyroclastic flow from Sinabung volcano today (image: @Rizal06691023/twitter)

The activity of the volcano is characterized by pyroclastic flows over the past days.

Surveillance cameras observed a few pyroclastic flows this week.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y3u7tv4x

Actively Growing Lava Dome At Santiaguito Volcano In Guatemala #SantiaguitoVolcano #LavaDome #Guatemala

Santa Maria volcano satellite image (c) Google Earth View

The activity of the volcano has remained essentially unchanged at elevated levels during the previous months characterized by pyroclastic flows and new period of extrusion of the dome blocks.

INSIVUMEH reported that extrusion of the dome blocks is appeared reaching over the edge of the crater of the Caliente dome and causes block-and-ash flows that continue to descend over the western and southwestern slopes, sometimes phoenix clouds are formed. The length of the flows is about 800 m. Accumulating of the volcanic material in the lower part and on the west and southwest flank of the Caliente dome can lead to formation of lava flows or moderate to strong lahars (mud flows) towards the San Isidro river channel.

A weak to moderate explosions at regular intervals of 15 to 20 per day are generated which reached approx. 9,842 ft-10,826 ft (3,000-3,300 m) altitude and extending about 10-12 km of the volcano.

Courtesy of volcanodiscovery.com

https://tinyurl.com/y2drtwhg